Sunday, July 24, 2016

Genealogy Journey's Podcast #14: Pioneer Day


"Pioneers Crossing the Plains of Nebraska" by C.C.A. Christensen via Wikipedia


Today is a unique Utah holiday, Pioneer Day. It's the day that the first Mormon pioneers who entered the Salt Lake Valley are honored. It's a good time for all of us to consider the pioneers in our own family tree.


References

Jean's bibliography (Please note this is in APA format):

Alexander, T. G.  Mormonism in Transition: A History of the Latter-day Saints, 1890-1930.  Urbana &
                Chicago, IL: Univ. of Illinois Press, 1986.
Berrett, W. E.   The Restored Church: A Brief History of the Growth and Doctrines of the Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints (12th ed.).  Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1964.
Carmer, C.   “The Birth of the Mormon Church.” In G. Lieberson & J. Meyers (Eds.), The Mormon Pioneers
(pp. 4-5), booklet accompanying Columbia Records Recording, LS1024.  New York: Columbia, 1965.
Cheney, T. E. (Ed.).  Mormon Songs from the Rocky Mountains: A Compilation of Mormon Folksong.  Salt
Lake City: Univ. of Utah Press, 1981.
Cheney, T. E.  “Notes on the Music.” In G. Lieberson & J. Meyers (Eds.), The Mormon pioneers (pp. 33-43),
booklet accompanying Columbia Records Recording, LS1024.  New York: Columbia, 1965.
Church Educational System, The.  The Doctrine and Covenants Student Manual. Salt Lake City: The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1981.
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The. “The Pioneer Story.” Official Internet Site of the Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  Retrieved from http://www.lds.org/gospellibrary/pioneer/            pioneerstory.htm, 2004.
Cole, B.  Mormon Battalion News web site. Retrieved from http://www.mormonbattalion.com/, 10 July 1997.
Cornwall, J. S.  Stories of our Mormon Hymns. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1975.
Corp. of the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  Hymns of  the Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints.  Salt Lake City: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1985.
Cowan, R. O.   Doctrine and Covenants: Our Modern Scripture, Rev. Ed. Provo, UT: Brigham Young
Univ. Press, 1978. 
Daughters of the Utah Pioneers.  Pioneer Songs Compiled by the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers.  Salt
Lake City: Utah Printing Co., 1932, 1978.
Davidson, K. L.  Our Latter-day Hymns: The Stories and the Messages. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co.,
1988.
Department of Seminaries and Institutes of Religion of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The. 
The Quest.  Booklet accompanying recording.  Salt Lake City: Corp. of the President of the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
Doctrine and Covenants of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day SaintsSalt Lake City: The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1981.
Emerson, K.  Doo-dah! Stephen Foster and the Rise of American Popular Culture. New York: Simon &
Schuster, 1997.
Fife, A. & Fife, A.  Saints of Sage and Saddle: Folklore among the Mormons. Salt Lake City: Univ. of
Utah Press, 1956, 1980.
Givens, G. W.  Language of the Mormon Pioneers.  Springville, UT: Bonneville Books, 2003.
Green, D. L. & Green, R. L. Meet the Mormons: A Pictorial Introduction to the Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints and its People.  Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1965.
Hafen, L. R. & Hafen, A. W.  Handcarts to Zion: The Story of a Unique Western Migration, 1856-1860,
with Contemporary Journals, Accounts, Reports; and Rosters of Members of the Ten Handcart
Companies.  Lincoln, NE: Univ. of Nebraska Press, 1960, 1992.
Hafen, L. R.  “The Mormons on the Frontier.” In G. Lieberson & J. Meyers (Eds.), The Mormon Pioneers
(pp. 6-9, 11, 16-19), Columbia Records Recording booklet, LS1024.  New York: Columbia, 1965.
Hanks, M.  “Perspective on Mormon Women: A Struggle to Reclaim Authority.”  LDS-Mormon.com.  
Retrieved from http://www.lds-mormon.com/women.shtml, 10 July 1994.
Hardy, L. C.  Boys Who Became Prophets. Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1982.
Hicks, M.   Mormonism and Music: A History. Urbana & Chicago: Univ. of  Illinois Press, 1989.
Horan, J. D. & Sann, P.  Pictorial History of the Wild West.  New York: Crown Pub., 1954.
Institutes of Religion of the Church Educational System.  Presidents of the Church.  Salt Lake City: Corp.
of the President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1979.
Kaufman, W. I. & Cheney, T. E. (Eds.). The Mormon Pioneer Songbook.  Bryn Mawr, PA: Theodore
Presser Co., 1980.
Kimball, S. B.  Discovering Mormon Trails: New York to California, 1831-1868. Salt Lake City: Deseret
Book Co., 1979.
Kjelgaard, J.  The Coming of the Mormons.  New York: Random House, 1953.
Knight, H. & Kimball, S. B.  111 Days to Zion (2nd ed.)Salt Lake City: Deseret News, Deseret Press, 1984.
Koon, W. H. (Ed.).  American Ballads and Folksongs.  Fullerton, CA:  unpublished manuscript, 1987.
Larson, C. V. & Maynes, S.  Women of the Mormon Battalion. Retrieved March 15, 2004, from “Brief History
of the U. S. Mormon Battalion,” Brian Cole web site http://www.mormonbattalion.com/, 1997.
Larson, G. O.  The "Americanization" of Utah for Statehood.  San Marino, CA: The Huntington Library, 1971.
Lavender, D.  The American Heritage History of the Great West.  New York: American Heritage Publishing
Co., Inc., 1965.
Lingenfelter, R. E., Dwyer, R. A., & Cohen, D. (Eds.).  Songs of the American West.  Berkeley & Los Angeles:
Univ. of Calif. Press, 1968.
Lomax, A.  The Folk Songs of North America in the English Language.  Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co.,
Inc., 1960.
Mattes, M. J. (Ed.).  Platte River Road Narratives: A Descriptive Bibliography of Travel over the Great Central
Overland Route to Oregon, California, Utah, Colorado, Montana, and Other Western States and
Territories, 1812-1866. Urbana and Chicago, IL: Univ. of Illinois Press, 1988.
McConkie, B. R.  Mormon Doctrine, (2nd ed.).  Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1966.
Nibley, P. (Ed.). LDS Stories of Faith and Courage.  Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1957.
Nielsen, Frank M. Mormon Trail Map. Corona, CA: Franko’s Maps, 2014. http://frankosmaps.com/
Oscarson, R. D. & Kimball, S. B.  The Travelers' Guide to Historic Mormon AmericaSalt Lake City: Bookcraft,
1965.
Our Heritage: A brief History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Salt Lake City: The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1996.
Pratt, O.  “The Perpetual Emigrating Fund - Emigration of the Saints and the Nations.”  In Journal of Discourses by
Brigham Young, President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, His Two Counselors, the
Twelve Apostles, and Others (Vol. 4, pp. 54-61).  Liverpool: F. D. Richards, 7 Oct. 1854.
Rich, R. R.  Ensign to the Nations: A History of the Church from 1846 to 1972.  Provo, UT: Brigham Young
Univ. Publications, 1972.
Roberts, B. H.   A Comprehensive History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Century 1 (6 vols.).
Provo, UT: Brigham Young Univ. Press, 1965.
Schindler, H.  “Mormon Trail.”  The Salt Lake Tribune on-line. Retrieved from http://historytogo.utah.gov/,
May 1997.
Shipps, J.  Mormonism: The Story of a New Religious Tradition. Urbana & Chicago: Univ. of Illinois Press, 1985.
Silber, I. (Ed.).  Songs of the Great American West.  New York: MacMillan Co., 1967.
Smith, J. F. (Compiler).  Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith.  Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1976.
Steber, R.  Pioneers (Vol. 11: Tales of the Wild West series).  Prineville, OR: Bonanza Pub., 1993.
Stegner, W.  The Gathering of Zion: The Story of the Mormon Trail. Salt Lake City: Westwater Press, 1964, 1981.
Stover, J. F.  The Routledge Historical Atlas of the American Railroads. New York: Routledge, 1999.
Urdang, L. (Ed.).  The Timetable of American HistoryNew York: Simon & Schuster, 1981. 
Walton, R. & Teare, B.  Dance, Pioneer, Dance.  Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1997.
Widtsoe, J. E. (Ed.). Discourses of Brigham Young, Second President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints.  Salt Lake City: Deseret Book Co., 1997.
Young, B.  “The General Epistle.”  In G. Lieberson & J. Meyers (Eds.), The Mormon Pioneers (p. 22),  booklet
accompanying Columbia Records Recording, LS1024.  New York: Columbia, October 1851.


Sunday, July 17, 2016

Genealogy Journey's Podcast #13: Colonial Life



REFERENCES

Books
B.A. Botkin, Ed. A Treasury of American Folklore: Stories, Ballads, and Traditions of the People. New York: Crown Pub., 1944

Burl Ives. Burl Ives Song Book. New York: Ballantine Books, 1953.

Alan Lomax. Folk Songs of North America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co., Inc., 1960.

Websites

Encyclopedia.com - Agriculture, American Indian


ABC News - 'Yankee Doodle Dandy' Explained an other Revolutionary Facts

Waltz the Hall

Wikipedia - Rock-a-bye Baby

SongFacts - Rockabye Baby

Smosh - The Actual True Meaning of Nursery Rhymes

Sunday, July 3, 2016

SLIG 2017 Opens Registration July 9th

**Note from Gena and Jean: Please consider registering for Course 6: Adding Social History to Your Genealogy. Gena is coordinating this course and both Gena and Jean are teaching the courses. We look forward to seeing you at SLIG!


Genealogists from across the nation and around the world travel to Salt Lake City, Utah each January to immerse themselves in a week-long educational experience called “SLIG.”

Going along with this tradition is the rush to get a seat in their course of choice when registration opens each summer. With limited seating to assure quality instruction time, one can imagine that some courses easily fill in a matter of minutes. This year that important date is July 9, 2016 – SLIG 2017 registration opens at precisely 9:00 am Mountain Daylight Time.

SLIG, or the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy, is entering its 22nd year of providing in-depth instruction for intermediate to advanced researchers. Hosted by the Utah Genealogical Association (UGA), the program will offer 14 courses to choose from in January 2017. In the SLIG tradition, courses focus on research principles, geographic areas, specific record types, methodology, and hands-on application, offering at least 25 hours of meaty instruction with the best teachers the nation has to offer. Some courses include labs, consultations, and yes, even homework.

The full list of available courses provided at slig.ugagenealogy.org includes: course descriptions,
prerequisites, required reading, coordinators and instructors, and a day by day course outline. The
program, which opens on Sunday, 22 January with a welcome reception and ends Friday, 27 January
with the UGA Awards Banquet, is held at the Hilton Salt Lake City Center, with lab and other events at the nearby world-famous Family History Library.

Whether this will be your first time attending, or your 22nd, we welcome you in joining us in elevating genealogical education to new heights.

############################################

Peg A. Ivanyo, Director

Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy

director@slig.ugagenealogy.org

801-515- 6644

website: slig.ugagenealogy.org

Sunday, June 26, 2016

Virtual Culture and Folkways With Jean




Today, in the 21st Century, we live in 2 worlds: the terra firma (well, so we hope – sometimes not so “firma” in So. California) and the virtual one. Try as we might to ignore this fact, the “virtual reality” is in our lives, even for those who do not personally use the Internet. This is because so many others do (like it or not, when you do your banking, electronic communication is employed; if you do anything with genealogy, somewhere along the line there is someone who is using virtual tools to accomplish a task, even if you hand-write a letter with the famous SASE for a reply or vital record; etc.). While some are fighting it (and I was a fighter for a long period of time, back before about 1995), those of us interested in family history are embracing it on different levels.

You can be like Gena and utilize most of the social media tools out there to hunt down living and dead relatives; like me, who acknowledges that it all exists but just doesn’t take the time to learn all the ins and outs (yes, I use Evernote® and enjoy it, but I know I am not using it to full advantage); or just use it minimally to look for ancestors on a website or attend webinars. It is that last one that I want to take a moment to discuss here.

Back in the time, BC (Before Computers), if you wanted to learn about genealogy you attended society meetings, learned from Family History Seminars at local Family History Centers, went to conferences, or accessed written materials (journals, magazines, books, etc.). And there could be a long time between learning one methodology and the next. Today, however, you can have a learning experience every day (and nearly every hour of every day, if you have the equipment and memberships) by tuning into webinars (live streamed or archived by various societies, most requiring that you merely be a member of the society to access their library – and a one-year membership usually would cost less than the value in a single video), going to the Family Search Help Center and then choosing the  Learning Center for videos on almost every imaginable genealogy topic, or take online classes in specific concentrations (some equivalent to a set of courses one would take for a major in, say, Social History).

On August 20 and 27 (Saturdays), in the morning (90 minutes) and afternoon (90 minutes) – times dependent on where you live (in So. Calif., those will both be in the morning) – I will be presenting 6 hours of instruction on “Learning About Your Ancestor Through Culture and Folkways” with an additional (optional) “Plus” discussion session on Wednesday evening, August 24. The 6-hour course costs $69.99 (for all 6 hours!!) and the plus session is an additional $30 (so $99.99 . . . OK, let’s say “just under $100” . . . for the whole experience). You will receive extensive syllabus material, one “assignment” that is a self-governed exercise to apply the material to your own family history, and one “exercise” (if you take the Plus session) that is turned in and evaluated by me with feedback received as quickly as practical. There is limited “seating” for the live-streamed program, so register soon, if you are interested in “attending.”

If you have appreciated the information provided by this blog and/or the accompanying podcast(s), then this course may be just what you need to pull it all together for application to your own family’s history. It is hoped that those taking the course will also get a better sense of the lifestyles of their ancestors, allowing them to know them better.

If this sounds like something you would be interested in, but those dates don’t work for you, the course will be archived and you can “take it” at a later date and at your own time schedule (spread over a longer or shorter period of time). The only exception to that is that the “Plus” session is not offered in the archived version, since it is a live discussion experience.

To register for the course, or any of the others offered by the newly formed Virtual Institute of Genealogical Research, go to http://vigrgenealogy.com/courses/ or read more about the Institute by checking out their home page.

Personally, I’m excited about being a part of this and here are the classes that will be included:
1)      “Culture and Folkways: definitions and roles”
2)      “Using genealogical resources to understand the lives of our ancestors”
3)      “Folkways and traditions”
4)      “Where they lived and what they did”

The Plus session will be a discussion on “Culture assimilation and breaking away”
Full explanations of what is covered in each of these can be found at http://vigrgenealogy.com/courses/hibben-folkways/ .

Being able to have the genealogy instruction brought right to you is one of the best aspects of our virtual world. We are no longer subject to the high cost of parking fees, sitting in traffic, spending money on gas, giving up a week’s pay for a hotel room for one night, then fighting to find a seat in an auditorium or classroom . . . it’s an amazing world. I wonder what our forebears would say about it!

--Jean Wilcox Hibben, PhD, MA, CG®